Gin Sold To Raise Money For Captain Tom Foundation Gets AXED After Claims It ‘Breaked Charity Law’

Captain Sir Tom Moore pictured with his own brand of gin in November 2020, which was sold with a promise that all profits would go to his foundation

Captain Sir Tom Moore pictured with his own brand of gin in November 2020, which was sold with a promise that all profits would go to his foundation

A gin sold to raise money for the Captain Tom Foundation has been discontinued for “violating the charitable law.”

Bottles of the Captain Sir Tom alcohol were launched in November 2020 with the Otterbeck Distillery in his native Yorkshire.

Since then, since April last year, the gin has been offered on the distillery’s website for £100, with a promise that ‘all profits’ will go to the Captain Tom Foundation.

But limited edition 50cl bottles were sold to customers with no details on the amount going to the charity – in violation of the law.

A spokesperson for both the distillery and the foundation told The times that ‘about £30’ from each sale goes to charity ‘after import duties and production costs’.

They added: ‘For the avoidance of doubt, Otterbeck expects around £30 from every bottle sold to go to the Captain Tom Foundation after service and production.’

But they did not clarify whether the gin was taken off the website because of the concerns, stressing that the bottles were only “intended for a short production run.”

However, not all 100 bottles have been sold.

Captain Sir Tom Moore pictured with his own brand of gin in November 2020, which was sold with a promise that all profits would go to his foundation

Captain Sir Tom Moore pictured with his own brand of gin in November 2020, which was sold with a promise that all profits would go to his foundation

Captain Sir Tom Moore pictured with his own brand of gin in November 2020, which was sold with a promise that all profits would go to his foundation

The branding on the bottle shows the iconic photo of Captain Tom using his walker to raise millions for the NHS

The branding on the bottle shows the iconic photo of Captain Tom using his walker to raise millions for the NHS

The branding on the bottle shows the iconic photo of Captain Tom using his walker to raise millions for the NHS

At its launch in 2020, the gin was described as a ‘delicate and herbaceous London dry with soft hints of citrus, rosemary and thyme. Fresh and aromatic reminiscent of an English summer garden’.

A 70cl bottle of the gin costs £35.95 with the promise that £1 of the gin ever sold will go to the foundation.

Captain Tom became a national icon after raising nearly £40 million for the NHS during the Covid crisis by walking around his garden to mark his 100th birthday in the first lockdown.

Named after the World War II veteran who died last year after testing positive for the virus, the charity was established to celebrate the older generation and contribute to organizations that support them.

However, it has since been embroiled in controversy and is subject to a Charity Commission compliance case.

The amazing fundraiser propelled Sir Captain Tom to a superstardom.  He was made an honorary colonel and was later knighted by the Queen (pictured) at Windsor Castle

The amazing fundraiser propelled Sir Captain Tom to a superstardom.  He was made an honorary colonel and was later knighted by the Queen (pictured) at Windsor Castle

The amazing fundraiser propelled Sir Captain Tom to a superstardom. He was made an honorary colonel and was later knighted by the Queen (pictured) at Windsor Castle

Pictured: Captain Sir Tom Moore receiving a knighthood with his family, Benjie Ingram-Moore, Hannah Ingram-Moore and Georgia Ingram-Moore at Windsor Castle, in Windsor, Berkshire

Pictured: Captain Sir Tom Moore receiving a knighthood with his family, Benjie Ingram-Moore, Hannah Ingram-Moore and Georgia Ingram-Moore at Windsor Castle, in Windsor, Berkshire

Pictured: Captain Sir Tom Moore receiving a knighthood with his family, Benjie Ingram-Moore, Hannah Ingram-Moore and Georgia Ingram-Moore at Windsor Castle, in Windsor, Berkshire

It comes after the foundation reportedly tried to pay his daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore a salary of £150,000, but the move was blocked by the Charity Commission

It comes after the foundation reportedly tried to pay his daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore a salary of £150,000, but the move was blocked by the Charity Commission

It comes after the foundation reportedly tried to pay his daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore a salary of £150,000, but the move was blocked by the Charity Commission

It came after it emerged that payments had been made to two companies owned by his daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore and her husband, alleging they were fees.

Accounts for The Captain Tom Foundation showed that only £162,000 was awarded in the first year, while about £240,000 of £400,000 in expenditure was spent on fundraising and administration.

They revealed that the foundation reimbursed £50,000 in expenses to Ms Ingram-Moore and her husband Colin’s businesses, including their consulting firm Maytrix. The Charity Commission said its “engagement” with the trustees of the charity is ongoing.

The charity also allegedly attempted to pay Ingram-Moore a salary of £150,000.

But the watchdog, which has been in contact with the charity about the set-up and management agreements since March last year, blocked the salary last summer after permission was requested.

The couple denies any wrongdoing.

She stepped down as chief executive last month, while the investigation by the Fundraising Regulator is still ongoing.

It said: ‘We are currently investigating the regulations at the charity and therefore cannot comment on this matter.

“We will continue to work with the Charity Commission to resolve charitable issues.”

Source: New feed