Judge calls Creamfields ‘biggest drug festival in Europe’ as he jails man for smuggling MDMA

David Bemrose, 33, from Cheshire, was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for attempting to smuggle in cocaine and MDMA at Creamfields Music Festival

David Bemrose, 33, from Cheshire, was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for attempting to smuggle in cocaine and MDMA at Creamfields Music Festival

A judge has blamed the ‘huge bill’ on taxpayers for drug problems at music festivals – after revealing that a four-day event required 693 agents to monitor it.

David Bemrose, 33, had attempted to smuggle cocaine and ecstasy hidden under his bum into Creamfields Music Festival – a popular four-day summer dance event in Daresbury near Warrington, Cheshire.

He convicted him, frustrated judge Patrick Thompson, who told Bemrose he was going to ‘Europe’s biggest drug festival’ after he… quitting for cocaine use was ‘not the best idea’.

Him too negate the amount of police officers and expensive taxpayer-funded resources needed to tackle drug abuse and trafficking at the dance festival.

Referring to the ‘huge drain’ on the Cheshire taxpayer’s resources, Judge Thompson added: ‘It’s quite an operation to deal with this problem.’

He also read out the number of police officers working each day of the festival – Thursday: 144; Friday: 180; Saturday: 187; and Sunday: 182.

David Bemrose, 33, from Cheshire, was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for attempting to smuggle in cocaine and MDMA at Creamfields Music Festival

David Bemrose, 33, from Cheshire, was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for attempting to smuggle in cocaine and MDMA at Creamfields Music Festival

David Bemrose, 33, from Cheshire, was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for attempting to smuggle in cocaine and MDMA at Creamfields Music Festival

The judge continued: “Those involved in the trafficking of Class A drugs at this festival should understand that if they are caught, they will face significant penalties.

‘In recent years people have been killed and seriously injured at the festival due to the use of class A drugs.’

Bemrose pleaded guilty at a previous hearing to possession of cocaine with intent to supply, possession of ecstasy with intent to supply, and attempted possession of ecstasy with intent to supply.

In last Thursday’s sentencing, District Attorney Clare Jones told the court how the violations occurred around 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, August 28 last year.

She said Bemrose, from Lymm, Cheshire, had several bags of drugs in his ass hidden in balloons.

These sachets contain cocaine and MDMA, but seven sachets that Bemrose believed to contain MDMA actually contain ground caffeine pill powder.

He confessed to possession of the drugs, saying some were for himself and that he would give some to his friends.

Judge Patrick Thompson said Bemrose went to the festival (pictured) to make money selling drugs

Judge Patrick Thompson said Bemrose went to the festival (pictured) to make money selling drugs

Judge Patrick Thompson said Bemrose went to the festival (pictured) to make money selling drugs

But Ms Jones said Bemrose only admitted this after passing several signs warning festival-goers about the consequences of taking drugs, several amnesty boxes and posters. As well as a warning on the tickets.

She also said that when his phone was analyzed there were reports that he was “sorting everyone’s drugs.”

The court heard that Bemrose has no previous convictions.

Defensively, Gareth Roberts said: “He has pleaded guilty to what we all know are very serious offences.

“He’s a man who’s never been to jail and never got into trouble — that’s a devastating reality in itself.”

Mr Roberts said Bemrose knows he has “disgraced” and “embarrassed” his family and is remorseful.

Referring to the messages on Bemrose’s phone, Mr. Roberts said this was just ‘talk’.

He also told the court that Bemrose has ADHD and before Creamfields had to go through drug addiction to deal with his cocaine use.

But when he sentenced him to two and a half years, Judge Thompson joked: ‘I don’t think it’s the best idea to come out of rehab and go to Creamfields Music Festival – the biggest drug festival in Europe. †

He also said it was “pretty clear” that Bemrose intended to “make money” and “take drugs” at the festival and that Bemrose ignored “sign after sign” and all amnesty bins.

Creamfields rave event returned in August 2021 after a one-year hiatus when it was canceled by Covid – and it was the first major music festival to be hosted in Cheshire since before its initial shutdown.

Thereafter, Cheshire Police announced a total of 29 arrests and a further 27 people would face criminal charges after being removed from the site.

Chief Inspector Simon Parsonage said at the time: ‘At its peak, nearly 70,000 people were in attendance and given the number it is fair to say that the crime and level of disorder were low.

“People were in a good mood and clearly enjoyed the opportunity to enjoy these types of events again after previous cancellations due to the pandemic.

“This year we had an increased presence with officers from Project Servator in attendance. The goal of this team was to disrupt a range of criminal activity while providing a reassuring presence to the public.”

Project Servator is a national operation that works with partner agencies, including other law enforcement, businesses and the public, to continue to protect people and make it difficult for criminals and terrorists to operate.

Superintendent Parsonage added: ‘We recognized that dance festivals of this nature are often associated with an increased prevalence of drugs.

‘We tried to do something about this by working together with other agencies during the run-up and during the weekend. We had a clear surrender policy followed by targeted searches at all entrances.’

John Dwyer, Police and Crime Commissioner for Cheshire, said last summer: ‘Creamfields is one of the biggest events we host here in Cheshire, and although a small minority of people didn’t follow the rules, it was great to see it event to see. ran well.

“I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone involved in the police surveillance. It’s nice to see more normality returning as the UK continues to navigate the coronavirus pandemic.”

Source: New feed