Man comes very close to one of Australia’s most venomous marine creatures.

In the video, Ricky Mackenzie's hand (pictured) can be seen in the water touching the octopus, unafraid of one of Australia's most venomous marine creatures

In the video, Ricky Mackenzie's hand (pictured) can be seen in the water touching the octopus, unafraid of one of Australia's most venomous marine creatures

Dangerous moment as man admires one of Australia’s most venomous sea creatures up close: ‘Look at the colours’

  • A man flirted with death when he touched the poisonous blue-ringed octopus
  • The man has made a name for himself and is never afraid to pick up Australian wildlife
  • Comments from the video labeled him crazy for wanting to touch the animal

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A man has posted a video of his extremely close interaction with a deadly blue-ringed octopus while admiring the creature’s amazing colors.

The video was posted to TikTok late last month by Ricky Mackenzie, who regularly enjoys exploring nature and is never afraid to get up and be personal with all kinds of wildlife.

The video shows Mr Mackenzie’s hand in the water touching the octopus, showing that he is not afraid of one of Australia’s most venomous sea creatures.

In the video, Ricky Mackenzie's hand (pictured) can be seen in the water touching the octopus, unafraid of one of Australia's most venomous marine creatures

In the video, Ricky Mackenzie's hand (pictured) can be seen in the water touching the octopus, unafraid of one of Australia's most venomous marine creatures

In the video, Ricky Mackenzie’s hand (pictured) can be seen in the water touching the octopus, unafraid of one of Australia’s most venomous marine creatures

The video shows Mr. Mackenzie and a friend admiring the animal as his hand moves toward it.

“Look at the colors on it,” Mr. Mackenzie says.

“That thing is crazy, isn’t it.”

Mr. Mackenzie’s interactions with animals, including snakes, monitor lizards, various species of lizards, crocodiles, fish and other marine animals, are regularly posted on social media.

Viewers of his latest post were almost unanimous that he was crazy to hold his hand so close to one of the world’s deadliest sea creatures.

Viewers of Mackenzie's latest post were almost unanimous that he was crazy to hold his hand so close to one of the world's deadliest sea creatures

Viewers of Mackenzie's latest post were almost unanimous that he was crazy to hold his hand so close to one of the world's deadliest sea creatures

Viewers of Mackenzie’s latest post were almost unanimous that he was crazy to hold his hand so close to one of the world’s deadliest sea creatures

“Keep playing with the most dangerous animals… one day your luck will run out,” one commented.

“You realize if that stabbed you, you’d be dead… right?” commented another, citing the obvious.

FACTS ABOUT THE BLUE-RINGED OCTOPUS

  • Native to the Pacific Ocean, the blue-ringed octopus can be found in the soft, sandy bottom of shallow tide pools and coral reefs.
  • When not looking for food or a mate, blue-ringed octopuses often hide in crevices, shells or marine debris.
  • If you catch them outside their cozy hiding places, it’s easy to see how the animal gets its name: When threatened, bright blue rings appear all over its body as a warning signal to potential predators.
  • While all octopuses (as well as cuttlefish and some cuttlefish) are venomous, the blue-ringed octopus is in a league of its own.
  • Its poison is 1000 times more potent than cyanide, and this golf ball-sized powerhouse contains enough poison to kill 26 people in minutes.
  • It’s no surprise that it is recognized as one of the most dangerous animals in the ocean.
  • So, what happens if you get bit by a blue-ringed octopus? First, the venom blocks nerve signals throughout the body, causing muscle numbness.
  • Other symptoms include nausea, loss of vision or blindness, loss of senses, and loss of motor skills.
  • Eventually it will cause muscle paralysis – including the muscles that people need to breathe, leading to respiratory arrest.
  • There is no known antidote, but victims can be saved if artificial respiration is started immediately.
  • If you ever come across this blue-yellow beauty, get back soon – the bite is usually painless, so you may not know you’ve been bitten until it’s too late.
  • Fortunately, the blue-ringed octopus is not aggressive; it is likely to bite people if cornered or grabbed.

Source: New feed