Threats at her university to prevent her parents from finding out she didn’t graduate

A woman made a series of bomb threats at the University of Otago in 2020 - forcing officials to cancel a graduation ceremony - because she didn't want her parents to know she had failed

A woman made a series of bomb threats at the University of Otago in 2020 - forcing officials to cancel a graduation ceremony - because she didn't want her parents to know she had failed

Read the disturbing emails sent by a student threatening to blow up her university to prevent her parents from finding out she didn’t graduate

  • Woman stopped bomb threat at graduation because she failed
  • She sent emails to Otago University after being prevented from re-enrolling
  • Wife had failed first year twice before and was afraid to tell parents
  • She referred in one of her emails to the terrorist attack on the mosque of Chistchurch

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A woman stopped graduation at a New Zealand university with a series of detailed bomb threats – all to prevent her family from finding out that she had failed her exams.

The woman, in her early twenties and whose name has been temporarily suppressed, has struggled with her mental health and grades since moving to New Zealand after being a top student in primary school.

Her grades suffered in high school and only got worse as she entered college.

She failed her freshman year twice and was suspended a third time.

It was after that that she decided to send the threats from a computer in a public library, the court heard, stuff reported.

Otago University was forced to suspend its December 2020 graduation celebrations due to the warnings that the facility’s chancellor said were deeply disturbing.

‘Best University of Otago. Since you guys suspended me, I’m going to ruin your graduation with some firearms and a little explosives. City hall will take a beating,” she wrote in the threatening emails.

“I’ll make the mosque attacks look like child’s play… Are you going to take the chance?”

A woman made a series of bomb threats at the University of Otago in 2020 - forcing officials to cancel a graduation ceremony - because she didn't want her parents to know she had failed

A woman made a series of bomb threats at the University of Otago in 2020 - forcing officials to cancel a graduation ceremony - because she didn't want her parents to know she had failed

A woman made a series of bomb threats at the University of Otago in 2020 – forcing officials to cancel a graduation ceremony – because she didn’t want her parents to know she had failed

The court heard the woman, who is on medication for anxiety and depression, struggled with the pressure to return to her parents without a degree.

At one point, she tried to take out a bank loan to buy a fake diploma after college rules prevented her from enrolling a third time after successive failures.

As a result, the woman decided to threaten Otago University by creating several email accounts, including “far.right” and “white.supremacy.rocks.”

The first threat was titled “Beware, Graduation Gun Attack,” which was sent on December 7, 2020.

The next threat referred to the shocking mass shooting at Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch in March 2019, in which 51 people were massacred by a white racist terrorist.

One of the woman's threats referred to the terrorist attack on a Christchurch mosque that killed 51 people in cold blood

One of the woman's threats referred to the terrorist attack on a Christchurch mosque that killed 51 people in cold blood

One of the woman’s threats referred to the terrorist attack on a Christchurch mosque that killed 51 people in cold blood

The university then canceled its graduations at the last minute, destroying graduates’ dreams and costing families and the institution an estimated $1.3 million in travel and organizational costs.

“It cost a lot more than money could buy,” Judge Claire Ryan said.

The woman sobbed in Auckland court on Thursday during the two-hour sentencing, where the judge wondered why she hadn’t simply spoken to her family about her struggles.

“Your parents, family and friends were proud of you and you were too scared to tell them about your failures,” Judge Ryan told the woman.

The woman’s request not to include a conviction was rejected by the judge because of her use of references to the Christchuch terrorist attack and terminology of white supremacy.

She also rejected a permanent crackdown on her name, with the interim crackdown expiring later this month.

The woman was sentenced to five months in community detention and nine months of surveillance.

Source: New feed